Non Scholae Sed Vitae Discimus.              Latin Courses at Saint Paul's School

The Roman playwright and philosopher Seneca once
complained: "Non vitae sed scholae discimus" (we learn not for life, but for school).*

At St. Paul's, we don't learn Latin the old fashioned way!

Blending the best of past
approaches with modern
technology and discovery-based learning, we offer classes
appropriate to all levels,
capacities, and learning styles.
Here is a summary of our
course offerings.

Latin Classes

First Year:
Latin 1:
This course provides an introduction to the Latin language and syntax. Graduated readings in Latin explore events in the life of a typical Roman household while also teaching grammar and vocabulary. Students also gain an overview of classical mythology, Roman history, daily life, and the geography of the ancient world.
Text: Lingua Latina, by Hans Ørberg

Second Year:
Latin 2:
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin 1.
This course begins with a review of material from Latin 1. Students learn more advanced grammatical concepts such as purpose and result clauses, conditional sentences and other uses of the subjunctive, and the comparison of adjectives and adverbs. Students continue to develop reading proficiency via textual narrative. Students also examine pertinent cultural and historical topics including the Roman Empire, government and daily life.
Text: Lingua Latina, by Hans Ørberg, plus readings at the discretion of the instructor.

Latin 2 Honors:
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin 1 OR permission of the Department Head.
This course offers an accelerated approach to the language. Emphasis is placed on advanced syntax, including uses of the subjunctive, uses of the cases of nouns, and techniques for translation and reading comprehension. Students study and pursue projects on a wide variety of cultural and historical topics pertaining to the late Republic and early Empire. Toward the end of the course, students encounter readings from prose authors such as Cicero, Livy, and Nepos and selected works of major poets such as Vergil, Ovid, and Horace.
Text: Lingua Latina, by Hans Ørberg, plus readings from Latin authors.

Third Year:
Latin 3:
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin 2.
This course begins with a brief review of grammar and syntax learned in the previous two years. Students continue to reinforce grammatical concepts and improve their Latin to English translation as they read graduated selections from adapted texts by authors such as Livy, Vergil, and Petronius. Emphasis is placed on improving sight translation and reading comprehension. Students continue to examine various relevant cultural and literary topics.

Latin 3 Honors
Prerequisite: Successful completion of AdvancedLatin 2OR permission of the Department Head.
This course offers a rapid review of the fundamentals of grammar combined with accelerated readings from a selection of original Latin prose and poetry which may include Caesar, Livy, Pliny, Vergil, and Ovid. In addition to poetic scansion and literary devices, students explore the historical and cultural context of each work through various projects.

Fourth Year:
Latin 4
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin 3.
This is a reading based course. Formal review of advanced grammatical concepts will be provided as necessary. The course provides students with an opportunity to analyze Roman texts as students improve their reading comprehension and sight translation skills. Various cultural and historical projects may include the Trojan War, mythology, religion, and love. Authors may include Vergil, Ovid, Horace, Cicero, and others.

Latin 4 Honors
Prerequisite: Recommendation by teacher and successful completion of Advanced Latin 3, OR permission of the Department Head.
This course begins with selections from Vergil's Aeneid with particular focus on major themes in Books I, II, IV, and VI. Poetic scansion is emphasized. In the Winter Term, students read Cicero's Pro Caelio, taking careful note of niceties of prose style and rhetoric. A look at the mores of late Republican Rome leads into readings from the poets Catullus and Horace in the Spring Term. Along with translation, students further their skills in analytical writing.

Fifth Year:
Latin 5 Honors
Prerequisite: Recommendation by teacher and successful completion of Latin 4 OR Advanced Latin 4, OR permission of the Department Head.
This course introduces students to Roman drama through advanced readings in Roman tragedy or comedy. In addition to translation, students typically study prosody, stagecraft, and the plots and characters of the Roman theater. Students also consult models from Greek drama in English translation and modern plays and films inspired by Roman originals. In the Spring Term, the class produces a play in Latin for performance on Anniversary Weekend.

 

(Opportunities for study beyond the 5th year level may be available by permission of the department.)

* Epistulae morales ad Lucilium, Epistula CVI